10 Common Myths & Misconceptions About Depression Debunked

Depression

DEBUNKING 10 COMMON MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT DEPRESSION

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) estimates that 15 million Americans are depressed.

Although depression is a prevalent medical disease, it is frequently misunderstood. Depression can be minor or severe, and it can even lead to suicide in extreme circumstances.

Clinical depression is a phrase used to characterize depression that is more severe. People suffering from depression find it difficult to openly about their condition and get effective treatment because of the stigma connected with mental illness.

Furthermore, many beliefs and misconceptions obstruct the creation and dissemination of awareness regarding the illness.

Among other important points, we’ll discuss:

  • What anxiety feels like?
  • What causes anxiety?
  • What does anxiety do to a person?
  • What are 5 symptoms of anxiety?

Let’s take a look at a few of the most frequent myths and debunk them.

DISCOVERING THE TOP 10 MYTHS AND MISTAKES ABOUT DEPRESSION

Is melancholy the sole sign of a depressive disorder? Is it possible for you to snap out of your sadness on your own?

Continue reading to discover out…

MYTH #1: DEPRESSION IS A MEDICAL CONDITION, NOT EXTREME GRIEF AND SADNESS.

Fact: One of the most common blunders individuals make is believing that depression is simply an exaggerated kind of melancholy or grief, and thus nothing significant.

Few individuals are aware that depression is a serious medical disease that necessitates prompt treatment. Sadness is just one of the numerous symptoms of depression, which can be caused by a variety of circumstances.

According to studies, persons with depression have higher levels of stress chemicals in their bodies, which can impair the way specific parts of the brain operate. While melancholy may only last a few days, depression, if left untreated, can last a lifetime.

MYTH #2: DEPRESSION CAN BE OVERCOME WITH STRONG WILLPOWER.

Fact: This is not accurate, because depression is more frequently than not caused by chemical changes in the body, rather than just a state of mind.

So, just as pure drive, strong willpower, and an optimistic attitude on life aren’t enough to help you heal from other medical disorders, they’re not enough to help you recover from depression.

Instead of relying on one’s willpower to overcome depression, or even waiting for the disease to go away on its own, medical aid should be sought.

Neglecting depression’s early symptoms can be perilous, and it can even lead to suicide.

MYTH #3: ONLY THE WEAK ARE AFFECTED BY DEPRESSION.

Fact: Depression has nothing to do with physical or mental strength. It’s just like any other disease or disorder, and there’s not much that can be done about it except seek therapy.

Depression can be caused by a variety of circumstances, and the truth is that it can affect anyone. Some of the world’s most influential people have struggled with depression at one point or another in their life.

MYTH #4: THERE IS NO EFFECTIVE DEPRESSION TREATMENT.

Fact: Many people feel that depression is incurable and that once diagnosed, you’re doomed to live with it for the rest of your life.

This is not the case, because medications and psychotherapy can effectively treat depression. The truth is that with adequate therapy, around 80% of patients diagnosed with clinical depression recover fully.

However, it is important to remember that recovery from depression takes time, and treatment may be required for several months.

MYTH #5: ONLY WOMEN ARE AFFECTED BY DEPRESSION. DEPRESSION HAS NO EFFECT ON MEN.

Fact: Most people believe that clinical depression affects mainly women, despite the fact that depression is twice as common in women as it is in men.

Males suffer from depression as well, but they are hesitant to seek help since some societies educate men not to show weakness.

MYTH #6: THE ONLY TREATMENT FOR DEPRESSION IS ANTIDEPRESSANTS.

Fact: Many people believe that swallowing drugs is the only way to get rid of depression.

Psychotherapy, on the other hand, is similarly beneficial, especially in cases of mild to moderate depression. The majority of doctors recommend a treatment plan that includes both psychotherapy and medications.

It has been noticed that different patients react to treatment in different ways.

MYTH #7: ONCE YOU START TAKEN ANTIDEPRESSANTS, YOU WILL NEED THEM FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE.

Fact: The majority of persons diagnosed with depression refuse to take medicine because they are afraid of having to take it for the rest of their life.

This, however, is not the case. Depending on the severity of the ailment, most individuals recover completely from depression after only a few months to a little over a year of treatment.

MYTH #8: DEPRESSION DOESN’T HAVE ANY PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS.

Fact: A depressed person not only feels sad, but also lonely and powerless, and loses interest in activities that he or she once enjoyed.

Depressed people avoid social situations and retreat into their shells. A patient suffering from clinical depression may also experience physical symptoms such as headaches, bodily aches, insomnia, excessive exhaustion, and so on, in addition to psychological symptoms.

Depression can lead to food disorders and substance misuse in some people.

MYTH #9: YOU WILL GET DEPRESSION IF YOUR PARENTS OR A CLOSE RELATIVE HAS IT.

Fact: This is somewhat accurate, because those with a family history of depression are more likely to develop the symptoms.

However, this risk is only 10–15 percent, and it does not mean that someone will suffer from depression simply because a close family has been diagnosed with it.

MYTH #10: DEPRESSION IS PART OF THE AGEING PROCESS.

Fact: Because statistics show that depression is more common in persons over 65, many people assume it is natural for the elderly to suffer from it.

This, however, is not the case. Depression in the elderly can be caused by a variety of circumstances, such as the loss of meaningful job, the death of a loved one, or health issues.

Depression is a medical disorder, not just a “stage” in life. Regardless of age, anyone experiencing depression symptoms should get help.

Children and teenagers, as well as the elderly, are susceptible to depression. According to research undertaken by the National Institute of Mental Health, one out of every 33 children and one out of every eight teenagers has depression symptoms.

Many people feel that discussing a person’s depression will make things worse, although this is far from the case. If you have a depressed loved one, encourage him or her to seek therapy.

Bonus Tip: There are also some medicine you can get prescribed to you by your doctor such as Clonidine for anxiety as well as over the counter anxiety medication.

Some people even try anxiety rings with moderate to high success.

Read More About: FABULOUSLY EFFECTIVE WAYS OF DEALING WITH DEPRESSION AT WORK

Read More About: What Is Depression?

 

 

ABOUT ME


Hi, I'm Laura and welcome to my blog.

I've been interested in the human mind since I was a child and that's the reason why I became a psychologist. I thought I had everything figured out, but it turned out I was suffering from anxiety for at least ten years without even noticing it. With the help of what I already knew, and some of my friends/colleagues, I compiled a list of articles that helped me go through my anxiety and get to the other side of the tunnel.

Thanks for stopping by, and I hope you find something to help you along the way.

Laura

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